Artist Ticket Picks: Marlene Dietrich, Warren Beatty, Elvis and more!

devil_is_a_woman_xlgWelcome to this week’s Artist Ticket Picks! The Artist Ticket program gives our customers a way to donate to causes that we care about.

If you’re an event producer, you can allow your ticket buyers to purchase limited-edition tickets printed with original artwork in your event settings. The ticket buyer will pay a small, additional charge of $0.25 and receive a limited edition, collectible ticket imprinted with original artwork. The current charity of our choosing will receive 100% of the additional charge. Physical tickets must be enabled on the event.

If you’re a ticket buyer, you can check to see if the limited edition ticket is available to you at the beginning of the ticket checkout process or by visiting the Artist Ticket page. You receive a small piece of collectible art and support a valuable cause just by checking the box in the Artist Ticket widget when you’re purchasing your tickets!

See a full list of events carrying the tickets on the Artist Ticket page, as well as find out more about the beneficiary for the current run of Artist Tickets.

So, without further ado, here are this week’s Artist Ticket picks:

Friday, December 13 I The Devil Is A WomanSeattle, Washington

The Devil Is A Woman is the last and most stylized of the Von Sternberg/Dietrich films. Stunning in bright black and white, it’s the story of Concha Perez (“The most daaangerous woman aliiiive” drones Lionel Atwill as a bitter and broken-hearted cast-off, filling in quite nicely for Von Sternberg).

Concha begins as a poorly dressed cigarette-maker with curiously impeccable make-up and hair in 1890’s-ish “Spain.” Cesar Romero, handsome as a God, plays the gay, young patriot enthralled with Concha after seeing her in perhaps the most intriguing Spanish-comb/pom-pom/mantilla combination ever enshrined on film.

The Travis Banton costumes for Miss Dietrich are over-the-top stunners, and really her hair is worth mentioning again: an ever-changing kaleidoscope of lace, Spanish combs, spit-curls and carnations. There are a lot of squawking, messy, flapping birds, so if you get bored waiting for Miss Dietrich to show up while the plot advances (an adaptation by John Dos Passos, but you’d never know it) those birds will give you something to think about.

Selected by the artist Mark Mitchell.


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